Art Exhibits in the Library

Gallery 1 (Skybridge) - see gallery description, Gallery 2 (Wilson 3, Balcony) - see gallery description, Gallery 3 (Wilson 3, East) - see gallery description

The Anatomy of Gray

 

Artist Statement:

 

In this body of work, I explore the correlations between the human figure and the Pacific Northwest landscape.  My intentions are to explore my own ‘sense of place’ and the associations between the body and the forces of nature.  In this way, I navigate and attempt to reveal the dichotomous relationships present in both the body and the natural world; the relationships between Decay and regeneration, the known and unknown, chaos and order. 

 

My imagery is culled from my life-long experiences in the PNW.  I contort abstracted, organic forms into things that have familiar, but not nameable relationships to the body and the natural world. I use this imagery and the ephemeral nature of paper to reference themes such as memory, loss, transformation, and the fluidity of things.  In my work I explore the precarious, unstable, hybrid terrain between the corporeal and the intangible.

 

 

About the Artist:

 

Melissa Hand is a Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate (2015/2016) with concentrations in drawing and painting.  She double majors in both Studio Art and Art History through the College of Fine and Performing Arts.  Hand was awarded a Creative Opportunities Undergraduate Research Grant through WWU’s Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (RSP), which provided the materials for the work in this exhibition. 

 

Contact:

For pricing/commissions--

handm4@students.wwu.edu

 

Exhibition on view in Galleries 1, 2, & 3

 

From June through July 30, 2015.   

(click on thumbnails for larger image)

Display by: Melissa Hand
Gallery 2 (Wilson 3, Balcony) - see gallery description

This exhibit explores snapshots of an individual: the hand, foot, shoulder, back and a partial view of the face.  Drawn in black and white charcoal on colored paper, the colors are muted.  The interest lies more in the forms themselves.

The intent behind this set of drawings is to examine.  Examine your hands.  They enable you-to climb a mountain, to swim in the sea, to do what you love and interact with the world.  They tell a story, always in a state of change; perhaps growing, freckling, or aging.  Perhaps the skin has grown tough from hard work or the muscles have grown strong from lifting and climbing, adapting to what we need from them.  The same ideas can be applied to the rest of the human form.

 

This exhibit was made by Emma Nestvold.

e.nestvold@gmail.com

emmanestvold.com

(click on thumbnails for larger image)

Display by: Emma Nestvold
URL for more information:
Gallery 1 (Skybridge) - see gallery description, Gallery 2 (Wilson 3, Balcony) - see gallery description, Gallery 3 (Wilson 3, East) - see gallery description

The Anatomy of Gray

 

Artist Statement:

 

In this body of work, I explore the correlations between the human figure and the Pacific Northwest landscape.  My intentions are to explore my own ‘sense of place’ and the associations between the body and the forces of nature.  In this way, I navigate and attempt to reveal the dichotomous relationships present in both the body and the natural world; the relationships between Decay and regeneration, the known and unknown, chaos and order. 

 

My imagery is culled from my life-long experiences in the PNW.  I contort abstracted, organic forms into things that have familiar, but not nameable relationships to the body and the natural world. I use this imagery and the ephemeral nature of paper to reference themes such as memory, loss, transformation, and the fluidity of things.  In my work I explore the precarious, unstable, hybrid terrain between the corporeal and the intangible.

 

 

About the Artist:

 

Melissa Hand is a Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate (2015/2016) with concentrations in drawing and painting.  She double majors in both Studio Art and Art History through the College of Fine and Performing Arts.  Hand was awarded a Creative Opportunities Undergraduate Research Grant through WWU’s Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (RSP), which provided the materials for the work in this exhibition. 

 

Contact:

For pricing/commissions--

handm4@students.wwu.edu

 

Exhibition on view in Galleries 1, 2, & 3

 

From June through July 30, 2015.   

(click on thumbnails for larger image)

Display by: Melissa Hand
Gallery 1 (Skybridge) - see gallery description, Gallery 2 (Wilson 3, Balcony) - see gallery description, Gallery 3 (Wilson 3, East) - see gallery description

The Anatomy of Gray

 

Artist Statement:

 

In this body of work, I explore the correlations between the human figure and the Pacific Northwest landscape.  My intentions are to explore my own ‘sense of place’ and the associations between the body and the forces of nature.  In this way, I navigate and attempt to reveal the dichotomous relationships present in both the body and the natural world; the relationships between Decay and regeneration, the known and unknown, chaos and order. 

 

My imagery is culled from my life-long experiences in the PNW.  I contort abstracted, organic forms into things that have familiar, but not nameable relationships to the body and the natural world. I use this imagery and the ephemeral nature of paper to reference themes such as memory, loss, transformation, and the fluidity of things.  In my work I explore the precarious, unstable, hybrid terrain between the corporeal and the intangible.

 

 

About the Artist:

 

Melissa Hand is a Bachelor of Fine Arts candidate (2015/2016) with concentrations in drawing and painting.  She double majors in both Studio Art and Art History through the College of Fine and Performing Arts.  Hand was awarded a Creative Opportunities Undergraduate Research Grant through WWU’s Office of Research and Sponsored Programs (RSP), which provided the materials for the work in this exhibition. 

 

Contact:

For pricing/commissions--

handm4@students.wwu.edu

 

Exhibition on view in Galleries 1, 2, & 3

 

From June through July 30, 2015.   

(click on thumbnails for larger image)

Display by: Melissa Hand