Art Exhibits - Archives

Tue hours: 7:30 am - Midnight

“Drip, Flick, Splatter”

The Western Washington University's Child Development Center takes art to a new level. Elaine Elkin's class of two to three year olds has recently studied the works of Jackson Pollock. Inspired by a book titled, “Action Jackson,” Elaine's students created their piece. By dripping, splattering, and flicking paint the children learned how abstract art can be beautiful and fun.
The project started with Western’s Art History Professor Carol Janson. In her Arts in the Community class students Tarin Nicholas, Lauren Sommers and Kayla Thompson decided they wanted to work with children for their community art project. Gina Elkin, a teacher at Western’s Child Development Center, gladly used the extra help to create this Jackson Pollock inspired piece.
Tarin, Lauren and Kayla provided some supplies and supervised the project, but the children were the artists. Together the class collaborated and one by one added layers of color. The whole project took three days to complete. The children used paint brushes, drip sticks and six different colors to create their work.
The ending result was beautiful. The children developed artistic techniques and Tarin, Lauren and Kayla had a great experience.


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Display by: Tarin Nicholas
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Allied Arts of Whatcom County is hosting its second traveling art show; Wild About Whatcom! Our goal is to spread local art around the county and increase the exposure of Whatcom county’s many talented artists.


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Display by: Allied Arts of Whatcom County
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Allied Arts of Whatcom County is hosting its second traveling art show; Wild About Whatcom! Our goal is to spread local art around the county and increase the exposure of Whatcom county’s many talented artists.


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Display by: Allied Arts of Whatcom County
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This “sampler quilt” was made after I won a consolation drawing in a fabric challenge at a quilt show in Elko, Nevada. I made one of the squares and was given the others. You will notice that all of them use a common “challenge” fabric. Along with the squares, I received an extra length of the challenge fabric to help in completing my quilt. I had the squares for many years, uncertain of how to combine all the diverse patterns and color schemes harmoniously. One day it just all seemed to come together.
This is a “friendship quilt.” The squares used on the front were made by friends and fellow quilters in Mendoza, Argentina, where I lived for 7 years. (The Argentine flag is on the back.) The grape fabric came from a “left-overs” bin in a small quilting shop in Victoria, BC. I bought it thinking I would use it for a single square. When I got home, I came up with the idea of placing it between the rows of squares to represent Mendoza’s vineyards – which meant I needed more fabric. When I checked back, the Victoria shop had sold all it carried, so I had to search on-line for another source. Eventually I was successful, and the quilt came together.


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Display by: WWU Art Comittee
URL for more information:

Allied Arts of Whatcom County is hosting its second traveling art show; Wild About Whatcom! Our goal is to spread local art around the county and increase the exposure of Whatcom county’s many talented artists.


(click on thumbnail for larger image)
Display by: Allied Arts of Whatcom County
URL for more information:

1975 – Quit Smoking…Took up Cross Stitch…Voila! Connie Mallison

The Marlboro Man collage is one of a series of Marlboro Man collages I did while living in Montana. Rumors that the Marlboro man in the ad was gay and the fact that cigarettes gave one cancer made the faux tough-guy, outdoorsy cowboy ads all the more ridiculous. Paul Piper

This art work shows my father, as “Rapper Jack”, performing in a night club. I wrote the words to the sea chanty (The Ballad of JHP) which he is rapping, and the figures in the “Whales Tale” club are characters from the chanty text. Curiously enough, they look a lot like him!
This work celebrates the power of words and the power of rhythm and the power of healing.
It is made with paper, gouache, black pen and a great deal of glue.
Leslie Hall


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Display by: WWU Art Comittee
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The Way I Saw It

For the last few years I have been creating art centered on the notion of the viewer versus the work of art, and the relationship that is formed when they meet. I like to believe that every piece of art embodies the fingerprint of its creator, a shadow of their emotion, their perspective of it during the time of its creation. As every fingerprint is different, the viewer is allowed his or her own unique interpretation. Formal qualities can be analyzed, color, tone, shade, composition, subject matter, but it becomes difficult to explain a feeling towards a work when its roots are from something other than its formal qualities. I believe this void is filled with what the viewer brings to the piece.

My work in The Way I Saw It series introduces myself in figurative representation. The mirror then becomes a window, a transparent wall between the outside world and myself. By showing the viewer what it is I see, I bring the fingerprint to the forefront, allowing it to boldly reach out and speak for itself.

This series in particular draws attention to the idea of memory, the ability to hold in mind. Moving from left to right, the series of prints tell a story of reflection, hinting at the idea that as humans, we are defined by our memory and our ability to reflect. By collectively organizing and analyzing our experiences, we utilize our cognition to recognize our individual make up and story. Yet, when we attempt to recall a particular memory, we find it to have slowly frayed and transformed from its original content. Furthermore, the works in this series attempt to explore where this blurred piece would fit back into the puzzle, and its affect on the makeup of our individuality.

Debbi Kenote


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Display by: Debbi Kenote
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Winterlude, is a body of work composed of oil paintings, exploring the notion of decay and the female body. The subjects in the paintings are sailboats, abstracted and visually explored. I begin by focusing on a specific part of the boat, generally a zoomed in perspective. I then use color and shade to represent the image and simplify the work into abstract forms. The sailboats in the images have been left out for winter, and collect leaves and other matter. As both a sailor and an artist, the boat is interpreted to me dually. First, it serves a functional purpose, to stay afloat, to keep water from entering. I find it interesting when these boats are depicted away from their functional purpose, and full of water, it’s as if to say they have now lost their value. I interpret them secondly as a metaphor for the body, in particular, the female body. It is hard to ignore the female connotations associated with the body of a boat, for example, referring to a boat as a “she”.

The nature depicted in the image can be seen as a parallel for society and the painting as a whole, a metaphor for societal decay on the female body. By painting these images I am recognizing the weight of decay upon the body, a gradual deterioration to an inferior state. The female body, like the leaves in fall, grows old, and eventually dies, however, the leaves will grow back. The same is true in society, collectively the human race continues on in generations, the old pass and make way for the new. Yet while the season change is annual and the old leaves must be shed to make room for the new, the deterioration of the body is permanent, irreversible. The boat then, can be seen as vulnerable. Unprotected and prematurely exposed to the harsh elements of nature, left to accumulate matter and speed up the natural process of death.

Debbi Kenote


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Display by: Debbi Kenote
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The Forest in the Trees
Jon-Erik Jardine
VisionaryConnection.wordpress.com
Trees surround us, but rarely do we spend time truly amongst them. The density of forest and the high production of biomass within our local area is one of the defining aspects of this place we call home. These forests are a home to many other organisms as well, small and large, as humans are but one part of a greater forest of life. This is a major aspect of my studies as a student, as I have looked at the psychological and sociological effects of forming deep and meaningful connections with nature. As an artist, I have expressed the emotional frustration and contradiction of trying to connect. This piece expresses a sort of severed relationship that exists within my mind and daily practice of life; how I wish nothing greater than to relate personally and collectively with life beyond just humans. By returning the “forest” to the “trees” in this piece, I am symbolically representing my own backwards struggle to connect.
These photographs are a tribute to our forests, and to our living, breathing planet. By using the natural resource of wood as the medium for displaying my forest-in-motion photos, I am exploring creative ways to share and connect to an ancient relationship between humans and the rest of nature. I often think that in order to have a connection to nature, I must be actively participating in some practical skills or knowledge pertaining to the “great outdoors”. This is but one way to form a relationship to nature, and as I am learning, a sense of connection or relating to something usually starts with a set of feelings or emotions. By displaying these photos, I am hoping to invoke these simple yet profound human responses we call emotions.
I am also exploring the concept of motion and movement. Motion is a key aspect of being human and of being an animal. We are fascinating creatures just in all the ways we move, as well as the ways movement has helped us settle into every corner of the earth. Specific to the photos, I am exploring the visual appeal of motion within a single frame. I am interested in how these photos may appeal to others. What is one’s somatic experience while viewing these photos? Is there some deeper connection triggered by viewing the blurred photos of trees? Was this once a common experience that may have existed in our ancient past?
Each piece was captured with a Nikon D200 while I was in motion. I then transferred each printed photo to blocks of cedar I salvaged, leftover from a Story Pole which can be found in the Whatcom Museum Lightcatcher building.


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Display by: Jon-Erik Jardine
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This series of five was inspired by the Puget Sound waters. Using limited colors and muted tones, I wanted to emanate the solemn and calm mood of the North West shore. The figures and creatures have a greenish tone to them as if the viewer is looking through water. When I began my early sketches on top of the maps, an extra challenge soon presented itself. Lines, colors, and numbers already existed on the paper. Instead of trying to defy what was already there, I used a combination of my own lines and the lines pre-existing on the maps. My own compromises that were made in the making I find somewhat symbolic of the relationship between humans and nature. We must be able to find a happy medium and work with nature. Some of my ideas had to be changed or cut out altogether but I find that this form of forced problem solving made the end result more interesting, and can apply to our world, of problem solving with nature, to make a more beautiful and healthy solution.

Special recognition to the Western Map Collection for providing the maps.


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Display by: Emma Nestvold
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