Art Exhibits - Archives

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The Giving Tree

Consisting of three panels, this work was inspired by the different challenges that I work to overcome in my life. Although the panels break up the painting, the tree and branches continue on over the gaps. The symbolism of the tree is also an important factor. Trees seem to have a way of continuing to grow even in difficult climates. Their initial growth path may be changed given what resources are provided, for example, switching directions in order to obtain more sunlight. I find strength in this imagery of such a solidly rooted entity.

Emma Nestvold


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Display by: Emma Nestvold
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Artist Statement
Kevin Nielsen

Kevin, an artist from the Bellingham community, paints by whim and by muse, swirling colors and sketching shapes. Sometimes he prints an image that strikes him and paints what he sees. Often the canvas draws him into its own composition.

Kevin starting painting in 1997, after a fire destroyed all his material possessions, with an empty canvas and a few tubes of paint. Hundreds of paintings later, he still paints for pleasure, ever evolving his talent and styles. From the “psychological pieces” (as his partner calls them) to landscapes, from oil on canvas to glue and coins on boards, the body of Kevin’s work ranges across medium and style (not to mention across the campus to offices where friends have happily hung his work).

See http://voidblossom.com/photos/thumbnails-2.html for more of his work.

Kevin Nielsen
360-389-0560
kevindivbyzero@gmail.com


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Display by: Kevin Nielsen

I enjoy drawing and painting patterns. I don't know if I would call myself an "Artist", but I have a creative side that people seem to enjoy seeing the products of.


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Display by: Drea Gramps
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Born in Okinawa, Japan, New York-based Yuken Teruya provides a refreshing modern take on traditional craft techniques. His work employs every day objects such as toilet paper rolls and shopping bags, usually considered symbols of consumerism or ecological imbalance, to create worlds of unexpected beauty. Rather than criticize consumer society, Teruya’s work invites viewers to read the works through their own frames of reference.

After receiving his bachelor’s degree in Fine Arts from Tama Art University in Tokyo, Teruya moved to the United States and continued his education at the School of Visual Arts in New York where he attained his master’s degree in the same subject. Teruya’s work has been shown in solo exhibitions around the world, including shows at the Josee Bienvenu Gallery, New York; Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica; Murata & Friends Gallery, Berlin; Basel, Switzerland; and The Ueno Royal Art Museum, Tokyo.


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Display by: Yuken Teruya
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This Campus School exhibit displays a number of historic photos taken between 1929-1967 that show children and their teachers involved in various activities.  Also included is information about the Campus School’s directors and teachers and its educational philosophy.  Used for training classroom teachers, the school educated community children from 1899-1967.  The exhibit is by Western Washington University Libraries Special Collections, a department of Heritage Resources.


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Display by: Tamara Belts
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Wilson Library, June 5 – July 31, 2013

This exhibition results from the intensive work of students in Art History 490, “Exhibition: Theory and Practice.” We spent spring term studying the ways in which exhibitions communicate ideas to a variety of audiences. With our WWU and Bellingham viewers in mind, students composed this exhibition from works they researched throughout the term, chosen from art collections here on campus. I wish to thank Erin Arnold, Hayley Boyd, Amanda Brebner, Yahir Cantero, Catherine Carlson, Kaija Eastman, Jake Fetterman, Emily Garvin, Holly Garwood, Deborah Kenote, John Lovejoy, Nicole Masurat, Alexandra Page, Caitlin Scott, Anna Skutley, and Kimberly Williams for their dedication to this project throughout the course of the term.

I would also like to thank: Dr. Sarah Clark-Langager, Director of the Western Gallery, and Paul Brower, Gallery Preparator, for their help preparing the work, providing photographs of the works, and installing the exhibition; Professors Seiko Atsuta Purdue and Benjamin Moreau, for helping us identify paper and print media respectively; Interim Dean Rick Osen, for his generosity in providing new lighting for Gallery 3 in Wilson Library; Leslie Hall, for introducing us to the gallery space and informing us about the procedures involved in using the galleries; and Connie Mallison, for helping us arrange the opening reception. The exhibition starts here in Gallery One (“Introduction”) and continues upstairs (directly above this space) in Galleries Two (”Journeys”) and Three (“Dwelling in Experience” and “You are Here.”). Enjoy!

Julia Sapin
Associate Professor
Art History


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Display by: This exhibition results from the intensive work of students in Art History 490, "Exhibition: Theory and Practice."
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Conceptually the idea for this work came to me in the form of a question. Is this art or fashion? I thought to myself, does it have to fit squarely into one or the other? Over the past few months my goal was to explore the relationship between art and fashion. To define and divide or unite and dissolve these commonly distinguishable boundaries. Fashion is and expression of our times with a constant desire to reveal and reinvent in continuum. Art is an expression of applied creative skill and imagination typically in visual form that is intended for pleasure rather than utility. These definitions served as my creative boundaries. Through use of props, costume and location I started with a vague idea and ran with it. Since this was an exploration I wanted to keep an open mind on what the final product would look like. In my experience the interaction of art and fashion lies within the tension created by the functionality and aesthetics of both dimensions.  


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Display by: Bailey Carrel
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I am an unexpected artist. My life took an unknown twist during my volunteer work that led to a discussion of oil paintings and , then, to art lessons from a fellow volunteer. The geometric abstracts developed as I painted landscapes and still lifes. Realism and impressionism became abstract; the distinctions among the three became clear. I could see the general shapes and colors.

Each painting becomes my favorite. I first see a painting when I close my eyes. The shapes are there; the colors come later. The joy is working out what goes where. The "how" and "why" keep me going. My most outstanding work in oil is the one I am working on that day.

 

Eileen Reardanz


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Display by: Eileen Reardanz
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I am an unexpected artist. My life took an unknown twist during my volunteer work that led to a discussion of oil paintings and , then, to art lessons from a fellow volunteer. The geometric abstracts developed as I painted landscapes and still lifes. Realism and impressionism became abstract; the distinctions among the three became clear. I could see the general shapes and colors.

Each painting becomes my favorite. I first see a painting when I close my eyes. The shapes are there; the colors come later. The joy is working out what goes where. The "how" and "why" keep me going. My most outstanding work in oil is the one I am working on that day.


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Display by: Eileen Reardanz
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Becoming an Artist

May is my birthday month.  I will be 62 years old.  Until about a year ago, I believed that I had no artistic abilities at all.  I couldn’t draw, and I certainly couldn’t paint. This was reinforced by a so-called beginning watercolor class that I took.  It wasn’t a beginning course at all, so I believed that I had been right that I was not an artist.  After that class, though, something clicked.  I had spent a LOT of money on watercolor supplies, so I was hesitant to totally give up.  I googled.  I found some easy watercolor lessons online and actually produced a couple of small paintings that my husband framed.  I was still, however, not an artist.

Obviously, something continued to eat at me, and I discovered Zentangle, a way of doodling.  I discovered that the ”tangles” didn’t have to be perfect and that I could let the them evolve the way they wanted to.  Around the same time, I discovered some online courses on drawing whimsical faces.  They were fun!  A friend encouraged me to try painting with acrylics, because they’re easy and forgiving and you can paint over whatever you don’t like.  I took an acrylic painting class, and I was hooked!  I signed up for many online courses and attended my first in-person retreat in June 2013.  Since then, I’ve been to retreats in Austin, TX, San Miguel de Allende, Mexico, Pt. Townsend, WA, and Salem, OR. 

Acrylic painting has become my passion, so I am retiring at the end of this month to be a full-time artist!  YES, I AM an artist!  I will be studying in Paris, France, and Brighton, England this summer and then in Raleigh, NC this fall.

I mostly paint abstracts with whimsy tossed in occasionally.  For the most part, I paint intuitively.  I don’t plan paintings (when I do, they usually don’t turn out the way I planned anyway).  I put multiple layers of paint on a canvas or other substrate, making random marks as I go.  Eventually, one or more images appear.  I might keep those images or paint over them and continue.  Many layers of paint add a nice depth to the paintings, which definitely adds interest. Big and bold are my favorite ways of creating art.

I paint because I feel compelled to.  I get “twitchy” if I stay out of my studio too long.  I love to share my artwork with others and find out what they see in the paintings and what feelings they evoke.

Thank you for taking time to look at my creations, and to WWU Wilson Library for allowing me to exhibit!

Patty Bover

April 2014


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Display by: Patty Bover
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