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TLA Dialogue Groups

This fall quarter, the Teaching-Learning Academy at Western Washington University will work on creating their BIG Question for this 2012-13 academic year.

TLA is a central forum that engages students, faculty, staff and community members in the study of teaching and learning. Each fall quarter, the TLA develops a BIG Question focused on enhancing WWU's learning environment.

Four dialogue group options are available:

  • Wednesdays at noon - 1:20 or  2 - 3:20 p.m.
    Oct. 3, Oct. 17, Oct. 31, Nov. 14 and Nov. 28
  • Thursdays at noon - 1:20 or  2 - 3:20 p.m
    Oct. 4, Oct. 18, Nov. 1, Nov. 15 and Nov. 29.

Group dialogues are held in Wilson Library Room 270, and the average running time per session is 80 minutes.

Students can receive communication practicum credit for participating in the TLA. For more information, contact Carmen Werder at carmen.werder@wwu.edu.

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Library 3 Things Newsletter

This year’s first issue of 3 Things is just for you, Western’s faculty! Check out pieces on leveraging electronic resources to save your students money, then a quick review of demand driven acquisitions' first year including a video showing how to submit a purchase request, and we wind up with some thoughts on why the Learning Commons should be as important to faculty as students. Note the quick survey link to gather your input.

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Digital Divide: LIBR 397C

This Fall 2012, learn about the Digital Divide and take LIBR 397C!

What is the Digital Divide?  A phenomenon occurring across the world, this four-credit general undergraduate course will examine issues around information inequity found within, and between, different populations.  Students will participate in service-learning opportunities in local libraries and organizations in attempt to better understand the same issues they will be learning in class.  Potential projects include – but are not limited to – workshops on tech literacy, bilingual workshops or pathfinders for ESL library patrons, working with prison populations, or K-12 schools. 

 

When: Tues/Thurs, 10:30 to 11: 50 a.m. 

Where: Haggard Hall 233

CRN: 43708

 

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E-books at Western Libraries

E-books at Western Libraries

Thousands of E-Books available 24/7!

Over the last several months Westerns’ library has been quietly participating in a very successful pilot program with our Summit partners to make thousands of e-book titles instantly available to you. The coolest thing about all these recently published titles is that there is no limit to the number of simultaneous users that can have access to these books. In essence they are never checked out and always available to you! 3 a.m. and you’re hammering away at that paper? No worries. Always available!

Need help locating or downloading an ebook?  There are a few different ways in which you might find and access ebooks at Western.
Get help from the guide  E-book Readers and E-books



 

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Archival Photos Document Lower Baker River Dam Construction

The Center for Pacific Northwest Studies is delighted to make available a collection of almost 1500 images documenting the construction of the Lower Baker River Dam north of Concrete, Washington. See here for online images.

downstream face of Lower Baker RIver Dam 1925Downstream face of the Lower Baker River Dam, December 6, 1925. (#LBDC1576)

Completed in 1925, the dam is part of the Baker River Hydroelectric Project that formed Baker Lake and Lake Shannon and which is operated by Puget Sound Energy (The Upper Baker Dam lies nine miles upstream, and was constructed in 1959).

The original photographs, transferred to CPNWS in February 2012, are well-traveled. They were shot by the superintendent of the construction project, George P. Jessup, and document the day-to-day process of construction on the dam during 1924 and 1925. Jessup and his family later moved across the United States as he worked on other engineering projects, and the collection traveled with them. The images were eventually donated by Jessup's daughter, Nancy Underwood, to the Coffee County Historical Society in Manchester, Tennesee, whose staff took steps to research and transfer the collection back to its origins: The collection was delivered first to the editor of the Concrete Herald, and then to the custody of the Concrete Heritage Museum Association.

Museum Board members pursued a successful collaboration with Puget Sound Energy (present owners of the dam), who funded a project to catalog, preserve and create digital copies of the images. Reference copies are now available for visitors to the Concrete Heritage Museum. The original images and digital copies are now housed and accessible at WWU's Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Emma Darmody, an intern and graduate student in WWU's Archives and Records Management Program, readied content for this digital collection hosted on the ContentDM platform.

Related holdings at CPNWS include records of the Puget Sound Power and Light Company (and over 50 subsidiary and predecessor companies that pre-dated Puget Sound Energy).

CPNWS is a program of Western Libraries' Heritage Resources, and is located in the Goltz-Murray Archives Building at WWU.

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Guide to Aerial Photograph Collection Available

Among the wealth of historic photographs available through Western Libraries’ Heritage Resources is the collection of over 30,000 aerial images archived at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Ranging in date from 1935-2001, these images were generated through numerous aerial surveys around the region, including the northwest counties and National Forest lands of Washington State. Formerly housed at Huxley Map Library, these valuable resources were transferred to the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS) in 2011.

Following extensive work by Eric Mastor to further organize and describe the collection, a detailed guide to available flight indices and accompanying sets of images can be accessed online. CPNWS staff welcome inquiries from the public about access and use of the collection, and recommend that interested researchers contact us for an advance appointment to view materials at the archives.  

Stereoscope used to view aerial flight images.

A stereoscope, as pictured above, provides a means to view overlapping, vertical images and obtain a magnified, 3D effect (useful for assessing the depth of terrain). Stereoscopes are available at CPNWS for use by researchers.

The majority of photographs in the collection result from aerial surveys conducted by US government agencies, including the USDA Forest Service and Washington Department of Natural Resources. These include coverage of Whatcom County, the Mt. Baker National Forest and other National Forest and Parks lands in Washington. The collection also includes some coverage of other Washington counties and U.S. states. For example, a small group of images document survey work conducted for the Alaska-Canada Highway during the 1930s. The collection is a valuable resource for researchers interested in environmental history and change (including forestation, glaciation and waterways), and supports fields of inquiry relating to habit restoration, urban growth studies and property history. All are welcome to contact or visit CPNWS to find out more.

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Steve Raymond explores the legacy of Roderick Haig-Brown

Steve Raymond, a life-long fly fisher and author, visited Special Collections and gave a presentation about Roderick Haig-Brown, fly fisher, author, and conservationist. 

The event attracted fly fishers from around the Northwest, who came to hear Mr. Raymond's insights into the literary works of Roderick Haig-Brown.  

Steve RaymondSteve Raymond

Before the presentation, Bruce Shepard, WWU President, presented a book about Western to Tobey Ishii-Anderson, niece of David Ishii, to honor the memory of David Ishii and his gift to Special Collections.

Steve and GuestsSteve Raymond with guests

After Steve Raymond's presentation, he answered questions about Roderick Haig-Brown and his own writing career.  Then everyone browsed the Fly Fishing Collections in the Special Collections storage area and the books exhibited in the Research Room.

Marian and Joan RaymondMarian Alexander and Joan Raymond

Raymond event

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Visiting students use Map Collection

Visiting students use maps to
help learn about Salmon migration

Korean students visited the map collection as part of the University Experience program sponsored by Extended Ed. 40 students, and 2
student teachers from Woodring use
the collection to study various aspects
of salmon migration. The groups took
a tour of the area followed by a presentation on the various types of maps in the collection before breaking up into small groups to work on their assignments.

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Fly Fishing Students visit Special Collections

Fly FishingOn June 25th, Special Collections was pleased to welcome the Huxley College of the Environment class ESCI 315: The Art, Science, and Ethics of Fly Fishing, taught by Leo Bodensteiner and Steve Meyer.  

The class was shown many of the treasures from the Fly Fishing Collection, including the first American edition of Izaak Walton's classic, The Complete Angler, or, the Contemplative Man's Recreation (1857).

The deluxe edition of The Dettes: A Catskill Legend (enclosed in a custom slipcase with a shadow box on the front containing three mounted flies by the Dettes), The AmericFly Fishingan Fly Fisher, a periodical published by the American Museum of Fly Fishing.  And the Art of Angling Journal, which showcases the beauty of the sport.

Bamboo rods, fly plates, and other realia were on display in the Research Room.  Later the class toured the storage area, exploring the complete Fly Fishing Collection. 

Fly Fishing

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