Western Libraries News

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Sanjuro 12/2/14

Masters of Japanese Cinema Film Series - Sanjuro

On Tuesday, December 2nd at 6:30pm, the Pickford Film Center will present Kurosawa's 1962 film Sanjuro, a follow up to his wildly popular 1961 film Yojimbo.  Sanjuro stars Yojimbo's Mifune Toshiro as a charismatic wandering samurai in mid-19th century Japan.  

 

The Masters of Japanese Cinema film series is one of the Pickford's longest run and most loved series. WWU librarian and series curator Jeff Purdue consistently chooses selections that represent the very best in World Cinema. Each film features an introduction from select speakers including local professors, educators, and artists.

 

Sanjuro will be introduced by Everett Aison, who was the original US distributor for Yojimbo, (meeting both Kurosawa and Mifune in the process), and who also designed the poster for the original US release.  Aison is also the co-founder of the Film School at the School of Visual Arts in New York City.

 

For more information about this film series, see the Pickford's website or contact jeff.purdue@wwu.edu.

 

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KVOS in the Local, Public Interest

On Wednesday, December 3rd , Western Libraries Heritage Resources Speaker Series presents “KVOS in the Local, Public Interest,” featuring Dr. Helen Morgan Parmett from 4:00pm to 5:30pm at the Goltz-Murray Archives Building (Bill McDonald and 25th Street). 

 

KVOS, Bellingham’s first local radio and television station, emerged amidst debates over the role those media were to play in American society. In this presentation, Dr. Morgan Parmett will draw from the Rogan Jones and KVOS collections at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies to illustrate the significant ways in which KVOS’s early radio & television stations helped constitute a sense of “local” Bellingham identify and culture. At stake in this history is understanding the role that KVOS played in broader debates over what constitutes “local,” especially within a region whose geographical positioning between two major cities and on an international border complicates any neat or clear definition of what constitutes local culture. This talk will thus illustrate how KVOS negotiated and ultimately helped contribute to debates over what it means for media to serve the local, public interest.

 

Dr. Helen Morgan Parmett is a 2014 James W. Scott Research Fellow and Assistant Professor in Western's Department of Communication Studies, where she teaches courses in media studies, critical media literacy, advocacy through media, and communication theory. She received her PhD from the University of Minnesota in 2012. Her research, which works at the intersections of critical media studies, cultural geography, and urban studies, focuses on relationships between media practices, race, and urban space. 

 

The James W. Scott Fellowships are awarded in honor of the late Dr. James W. (Jim) Scott, a founder and first Director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS), and a noted scholar of the Pacific Northwest region. The awards were established to promote awareness and use of archival collections at Western and to forward scholarly understandings of the Pacific Northwest. Funds are awarded to scholars undertaking significant research using archival holdings at CPNWS.

 

This is the second event in an annual series of presentations that will feature scholars who have used Heritage Resources’ collections significantly in their research. All programs are free and open to the public. Please email Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu or phone (360) 650-6621 for more information.

Partners in Teaching and Learning

The instruction plan for Western Libraries Heritage Resources articulates the goal of ensuring that Western students “are able to find, understand, and interpret a wide variety of research sources in various contexts throughout their lives.” With that in mind, Heritage Resources staff work closely with instructors to meet specific course needs and learning objectives by providing access to a wealth of materials that can enhance, enrich, and enliven research in nearly any subject area.

 

For example, this past August, a new cohort of Environmental Education graduate students visited Western’s campus and spent time working with archival and primary source materials at the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies (CPNWS).  As part of the M.Ed Residency program partnership between the North Cascades Institute (NCI) and Western’s Huxley College of the Environment, these students live at the Environmental Learning Center located in the North Cascades National Park for one year, during which time they are able to immerse themselves in place-based pedagogy.

 

At the heart of place-based education is the recognition that experiential community-based learning enhances a student’s educational experience by treating the local community as one of the primary sources for teaching and learning. The mission of the CPNWS is to “enhance public and scholarly understanding of the region’s past and present,” and this natural programmatic alignment led Huxley faculty and Heritage Resources staff to recognize an opportunity for collaboration.

 

In preparation for the on-site visit, Heritage Resources staff arranged a selection of original and archival materials representative of various perspectives of place - including environmental, economic, recreational, and indigenous views - for students to review and analyze. In the Archives Building Research Room, students divided into groups and reviewed the maps, photographs, pamphlets, letters, and other materials. Together they considered issues related to the construction of cultural and regional identity, the evolution of policy, perceptions of concepts such as “conservation” and “wilderness,” and the significance of place names in determining cultural values. Course instructor and NCI Graduate Program Coordinator Joshua Porter posed several challenging questions, which led to lively and interactive class discussions.

 

Different resources on each table give you insight in terms of both the media and the policy – How does the creation of information determine the ‘value’ of whatever is being discussed? What is the leverage you have if you are creating these maps? What is your leverage in terms of conveying to the world what matters, what has value, what has meaning?” asked Porter.

 

Several students questioned what could be the implications for the cultural heritage of a place when traditional native names were removed and replaced with new names. Others pointed out how some of the maps were defined in terms of resource extraction rather than conservation. When looking at the photographs, some students observed how having access to archival materials like these gave them a glimpse into the lives of people from the past, bringing them closer despite the passage of time and changes in cultural contexts. Often these glimpses inspired unexpected insights and additional questions.

 

“Although there was a lack of reciprocity in terms of resource extraction, it’s also impossible to miss the level of intimacy between the people and the land in these photographs, even if the conservation policy was lacking at that time. It would be so interesting to talk to these people. The photographs capture historical moments as opposed to all of the moments of everyday life. Another mode of inquiry would also be interesting to pursue,said student Liz Blackman.

 

After this observation, Roz Koester, Assistant Archivist for Outreach and Instruction for Heritage Resources, was quick to mention the oral histories that are also contained at the CPNWS, and invited Blackman to return if she would like to further explore those personal narratives. Koester explained that oral histories offer an opportunity to hear from the people we are interested in first-hand and in their own words. She also mentioned that sometimes people will begin their research with certain expectations about what they are going to find, but often their perspectives will alter as a result of the information they encounter.

 

“Exploring these types of complexities is part of the beauty of working with primary sources. You can come to these materials with a bias and that is where you start your inquiry, but the records that are here can present an opportunity to challenge that bias. Original, archival, primary source research offers us insight that can make us challenge our own assumptions, our own points of view. You might be led in a completely different direction than what you originally intended. As archivists, it’s the critical analysis piece that we really want people to get out of this experience,” explained Koester.

 

The class concluded with Porter leading a discussion about how students and educators can benefit in utilizing the materials offered by Heritage Resources to explore the relationship between how meaning is constructed, how cultural values are expressed, the impact this can have on policy and information creation, and how this in turn affects our own assumptions about both people and place. Porter also pointed out that as environmental educators, the students should remember that no matter where they go once they have completed graduate school, they can use archival and primary source materials to benefit their future teaching and learning practices.

 

“Moving forward, I really encourage all of us to continue to do research here, but also to keep in mind what resources there are in every community that we enter into in the future, how to sleuth out those resources and how, as educators, we can uses these sources,” stated Porter.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes Special Collections, the University Archives & Records Management, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Together the three programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support teaching, learning, and research. If you’d like to learn more about the Heritage Resources Instruction Program, or are interested in discussing how Heritage Resources can support your teaching and learning needs, please contact Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu or phone (360) 650-6621.

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Canines on Campus

Beginning Monday, December 1st through Thursday December 11th, Western Libraries will be joined by members of the “Canines on Campus” program, (formerly known as “Pet Partners). Feel free to stop by the library to say hi and de-stress when you are in need of a break from studying for finals, working on projects, or writing those last few papers!

 

Animals who are part of the Canines on Campus program are registered through several different agencies and have met certain standards of skills and aptitude. Whatcom Therapy Dogs and Dogs on Call are the two organizations which provide volunteers to the Canines on Campus program, and teams of our favorite humans and animals (which still include Smokey the cat!) will be located in the gallery space at the end of the Skybridge on the Wilson side of the library between the hours of 10am and 8pm.

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Display Cases Available

Western Libraries provides access to display cases to departments and organizations at Western as part of its service to the academic community.  Exhibit cases are available to any Western-affiliated organization, and may be reserved for one to two months. 

Exhibits in the Libraries are created to direct attention to the materials, services, and aims of the Libraries, or to reflect the aims, goals, and services of departments and organizations at Western.  Past exhibits have included examples from the Children’s Literature Conference, the Students for Sustainable Water Associated Students club and their water bottle recycling program, and the Transportation Services promotion of the “May is Bike Month” campaign.  The Libraries’ exhibit cases are also an excellent forum for showcasing student work. 

If you are interested in making a request for a display, please make your reservation by submitting the online application form at least one month before the date you wish to begin your exhibit. Request approval is subject to case availability. For more information about current exhibits or exhibit policies, see the Display Case Exhibits web page

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How OneSearch Can Help You

OneSearch is Western’s new search interface that retrieves results from databases and catalogs found in academic libraries across the Pacific Northwest. In OneSearch, content owned by Western is immediately accessible by our students, staff, and faculty; all other content from neighboring institutions can be requested and quickly delivered. OneSearch will continue to evolve and improve this year when all 37 Orbis Cascade Alliance libraries complete the migration of their catalog and database records into the new shared system.

OneSearch is Western’s name for the Primo™ search engine product developed by the international information systems vendor Ex Libris. This product has been adopted by academic libraries around the world, including California State University at Sacramento, George Mason University, Cardiff University, University of Cape Town, and Harvard University Library. Note: You can find a comprehensive list of academic libraries that have implemented Primo as their institutional catalog here.

How can OneSearch serve you? Here is an overview of what OneSearch can offer Western faculty and students:

For Western’s Faculty & Staff:

  • Browse Searching: Browse by author, title, subject heading, SUDOC number, and Library of Congress call number within OneSearch.
  • Known Journal Title Searching: Need access to a specific journal? Search by journal title in the A-Z Journals interface.
  • Languages: Filter search results by several languages.
  • Heritage Resources: Search for, and retrieve, item records that detail holdings within Western Washington University’s Heritage Resources Department, including Western Libraries Special Collections, University Records & Archives, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies.
  • Library of Congress Classification Facet: Filter search results through a new LC Classification facet, which can enhance the disciplinary relevance of your results.
  • Research & Library Services Management: Manage your research and library services experience through the My Account functionality. Save items, searches, and more to your e-Shelf.

For Western’s Students:

  • Breadth of Resources from a Single Search Interface: Using the ‘Books, Articles + More’ scope, students can search for content across databases and catalogs. For a full list of data sources, please refer to this list.
  • Research & Library Services Management: OneSearch allows students to manage their research and library services experience through the My Account functionality, where they can save items, searches, and more to their e-Shelf.

Future Directions

During this academic year, the OneSearch Management Team will continue the transition from the Libraries old catalog system to a fully implemented shared catalog that draws upon data sources from the Orbis Cascade Alliance’s 37 member libraries. During this time of transition, the Team (a taskforce devoted to improving OneSearch) will continue to actively seeking faculty and student feedback. If you have experienced particular benefits or limitations with the product, or have suggested improvements or enhancements, we very much want to hear from you. Please contact Rebecca Marrall to set up a time for her to visit you. And for one-stop information about OneSearch functionality and examples of continuing product improvements, please see http://libguides.wwu.edu/onesearch.

For more information, contact:

Rebecca M. Marrall / Diversity & Disability Services Librarian, Asst. Professor / Western Libraries, WL275 / (360) 650 – 4493 rebecca.marrall@wwu.edu

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The Tale of Corally Crothers

Author: 
Romney Gay
Publication Information: 
Cleveland: Harter Publishing Company, 1932.
Location: 
Special Collections Children's Collection
Call Number: 
PZ8.3.G39 Cort 1932
November, 2014

The Tale of Corally Crothers is a charming story of an only child in search of a friend. She arose one morning, bathed, dressed, packed and determinedly went off to find her friend -- which turns out to be you! The story is written in rhyme and includes lovely Art Deco illustrations created by the author. 

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Writing Resources for Grad Students

Did you know the Writing Center offers resources and info sessions specifically for graduate students? Beginning this Thursday, October 30th, there will be a number of opportunities throughout the quarter for you to get assistance, tips, and information to help you with your research and writing projects.

Questions? Email grad.writing.center@wwu.edu for more information, or go to http://libguides.wwu.edu/gradwritingcenter

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New Heritage Resources Speaker Series

Western Libraries Heritage Resources is pleased to announce that it will host its first annual Speaker Series during the 2014-2015 academic year. Featured presenters are authorities in their respective fields who have used Heritage Resources collections significantly in their research. All programs are free and open to the public. Please email Heritage.Resources@wwu.edu or phone (360) 650-7534 for more information.

2014-2015 Heritage Resources Speaker Series Line-Up:

  • Wednesday, November 12th at 4:00 p.m. in Special Collections: Sylvia Tag, WWU Librarian and Associate Professor/Curator of the Children’s Literature Interdisciplinary Collection. What are the aims, ideals, and desires that we impart upon our children and youth? Tag's presentation will explore this question by examining the language, illustration, and composition of early readers, primers, and historical textbooks dating from 1866-1973.
  • Wednesday, December 3rd at 4:00 p.m. at the Goltz-Murray Archives Building: Helen Morgan Parmett, WWU Communication Studies Professor and 2013-2014 James W. Scott Research Fellow, will discuss how KVOS - Bellingham's first radio and television station - helped constitute a sense of "local" identity and culture in the 1930s-1970s.
  • Tuesday, January 13th at the Goltz-Murray Archives Building: Michael Vendiola, doctoral student in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Washington, will present on his research related to the College of Ethnic Studies at Western Washington State College (now WWU).
  • Tuesday, February 3rd at 4:00 p.m. in Special Collections: Seth Norman, Pulitzer-nominated author and renowned fly fisherman, will disucss the art and craft of writing about fly fishing.
  • Tuesday, April 7th at 4:00 p.m. in Special Collections: Sandra Kroupa, Book Arts and Rare Book curator at the University of Washington Special Collections, will examine how artists' books are received when they are viewed in person versus as visual images or through exhibition.
  • Tuesday, May 5th at 4:00 p.m. in the Wilson 4 Central Reading Room: Ron Judd, Seattle Times reporter and WWU Journalism Instructor, will explore the history and context surrounding a mid-1930s "Red Scare" in Bellingham and how it potentially impacted the campaign to remove Western Washington College of Education (now WWU) President Charles H. Fisher from office.

 

Heritage Resources is a division of Western Libraries which includes Special Collections, the University Archives and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Together the three programs provide for responsible stewardship of unique and archival materials in support teaching, learning, and research.

 

 

 

 

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