Western Libraries News

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The Speed of Trust

What do you know about the “speed of trust?” In Stephen Covey’s book, The Speed of Trust, he states:

“Nothing is as inspiring as an offering of trust. Trust truly is the one thing that changes everything. And there has never been a more vital time for people to establish, restore, and extend trust at all levels than in today’s new global society.”

With that said, the Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA) would like to welcome faculty, staff, students, and community members to join in on this quarter’s dialogue surrounding trust on our campus and within our community. The spring 2014 dialogue group options include Wednesdays@12 or Wednesdays@2 on these dates: Apr. 9, 23, May 7, 21.  Also on Thursdays@12 and Thursdays@2 on these dates: Apr. 10, 24, May 8, 22. TLA begins meeting the second week of the quarter and continues every other week after that for a total of four sessions.  All sessions are held in Wilson Library 2 West.

Fall quarter’s TLA members crafted the big study question for the rest of this year: How do we ignite passion, purpose, and potential to co-create a culture of trust? To sign up for a dialogue group and get on the list serve, please email Shevell.Thibou@wwu.edu

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A Fresh New Look for the Western Libraries Website!

Western Libraries is pleased to announce that the library website will be getting a fresh new look starting March 24, 2014! You will quickly realize that although things may look different, the underlying functionality remains the same. The services you are used to will still be available, but they will be easier to find. The terminology you are familiar with will not change. The menus and overall navigation of the site will continue to focus on Research, Collections, Services, and information About the Library.

The changes we are making will help us better serve the entire WWU community by aligning Western Libraries with an institutional graphic identity. The Western Repositioning Initiative established a set of style and branding guidelines in order to provide a more consistent experience for users exploring the university’s webpages.

Additionally, the Western Libraries website will migrate from Drupal 6 to Drupal 7. Drupal 7 is the current, stable version of the popular CMS. This move creates opportunities to work with other campus web developers to harness the power of Drupal to deliver content in new and exciting ways. Likewise, the new Libraries website will deliver content to users regardless of what type of device is used to access the site, whether content is displayed on a large monitor or a smaller mobile device.

UPDATE: Please see the summary report of the usability survey conducted in early February, 2014.

For more information about Western Libraries new website, contact Jon.Dillon@wwu.edu

 

New Website

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Campus and Community Children Exhibit

In case you haven't yet seen it, we want to share with you the news about a special exhibit featuring photographs that span over 70 years of history for the community and Western Washington University. Western Libraries Heritage Resources, Librarian Sylvia Tag, and the Libraries' Art Exhibit Team, Leslie Hall and Michelle Becker, have worked together to create this unique exhibit that features a variety of photographs depicting children, teenagers, and educators both inside classrooms and outside in the natural environment. We hope these photos help you connect to the lively world of those who came before us! 

This exhibit is located on the 4th floor of Wilson Library, in the alcove area outside the Reading Room. Photographs were selected from all three Heritage Resources programs: University Archives and Records Center, Special Collections, and the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Heritage Resources works to document the culture and history of Western, the local community and Pacific Northwest region, and to promote public and scholarly access to holdings.

Photograph titles have been supplied by the Art Exhibit team, with the exception of some original titles supplied by the photographer or the collector. If you are interested in more information about a particular photo on display, or would like to learn more about duplication policies and fee schedules, please note the ID reference code and the name of the collection, listed in the descriptive text, and contact the designated Heritage Resources program.  

For more information about art exhibits in Western Libraries, contact Leslie.Hall@wwu.edu or Michelle.Becker@wwu.edu

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Wild Steelhead : The Lure and Lore of a Pacific Northwest Icon

Author: 
Gallagher, Sean M.
Publication Information: 
Mill Creek : Wild River Press, 2013
Location: 
Fly Fishing Collection
Call Number: 
SH687.7 .G35 2013 (two volumes)
January, 2014

This two volume collection of Steelhead lore is a repast for anyone interested in that most mysterious and difficult to catch of all fish, the Steelhead. Concentrating on the Pacific Northwest, this wonderful collection interweaves biology, natural history, interviews, memoir, stories, photographs, techniques, and place in a rich and often startling visual presentation.

Kali Legg Awarded "Best Student Presentation"

Western Washington University students have a reputation for contributing to scholarship, research, collaboration, and service, and we here at Western are particularly proud of how they exemplify Western’s motto of “active minds changing lives.” Recently, Western Libraries very own Learning Commons student liaison Kali Legg received recognition for her significant contribution to research and scholarship when she was awarded the title of “Best Student Presentation” at the 2013 International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (ISSOTL) conference.

Kali is an Environmental Science major who has also been actively involved with the Teaching-Learning Academy (TLA) here at Western as both a student participant and also through her role as Learning Commons student liaison. Incorporating voices from a variety of backgrounds and perspectives, TLA was established at Western in 2001 with the mission of creating a community of scholars who could work together to better understand the existing learning culture, share that understanding with others, and enhance the learning environment by exploring multiple views of teaching and learning. It was partly because of her involvement with TLA that Kali was selected to attend the ISSOTL conference and act as a representative of the many exceptional students at Western who are actively engaged in exploring the research and scholarship of teaching and learning. Kali both appreciated and recognized the value of this tremendous opportunity.

“This conference helped me further realize that I have a passion for education—well more for learning. I have a passion for learning. And I felt incredibly fortunate to be able to share and receive ideas about learning from some very brilliant and kind individuals from all over the world…” Kali stated.

Together with Western Libraries staff and faculty Shevell Thibou and Carmen Werder from the Teaching-Learning Academy, along with Tim Costello from the Center for Service Learning, Kali introduced and co-led the session entitled “Transforming Teaching and Learning Cooperatives.” Together they explored a number of “partnering” models and examined the concepts of “co-location,” “collaboration,” and “co-inquiry,” posing the questions: “To what extent are these partnering models distinct and yet interrelated relationships on a continuum? And how might understanding this cooperative continuum model facilitate institutional change for teaching and learning?” 

Using case studies, this group was able to provide an analytical model that defined co-location as referring to shared space, collaboration as sharing an interest in reaching a common outcome, and co-inquiry as sharing an interest in addressing a common question. One of the case studies used focused specifically on the Learning Commons, and illustrated how co-location has actually led to collaboration and co-inquiry. Such research is often inspired by the work that is being done in the TLA, which serves as the hub for the study of teaching and learning at Western, and engages student participants in its ongoing dialogue with faculty, staff, and community members.

The annual ISSOTL conference includes faculty, staff, graduate and undergraduate students from a number of institutions located throughout the world.  This international audience responded enthusiastically to Kali’s award-winning presentation, and Kali later explained how this conference was also valuable for her in that it affected her own views about education and the learning experience.

“I have come to realize that learning and learning theory should be present in every discipline. I would like to make what I've learned at the ISSOTL conference present in my learning experience and that of my peers whenever I can, no matter what kind of classroom or working environment I'm in,” Kali explained.

ISSOTL was founded in 2004 by a group of 67 scholars from several different countries, to recognize and promote scholarly communication on teaching and learning, to foster interdisciplinary collaboration and the integration of “discovery, learning and public engagement.” Each year, members of this organization come together to share research and experiences related to the scholarship of teaching and learning. This most recent conference was held October 2-5, 2013 in Raleigh, North Carolina, and focused on the theme of “Critical Transitions in Teaching and Learning.”

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Heritage Resources contributes to "Grit" exhibit at Seattle's Wing Luke Museum

Western Libraries Heritage Resources is pleased to be a Project Contributor on a new exhibition from the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience in Seattle, WA. The exhibit, entitled Grit: Asian Pacific Pioneers Across the Northwest, “uncovers the true stories of the men and women who migrated to the region from the Asia Pacific,” and “reminds us of Asian Pacific Americans’ long history of fortitude and resilience as they established communities in the Pacific Northwest.” One of the featured stories is that of Lummi/Hawaiian fiddler Charley Kahana and the exhibit includes images of Kahana drawn from the Howard E. Buswell collection at Heritage Resources’ own Center for Pacific Northwest Studies.

Grit poster

Grit opened on December 12, 2013 and runs through October 19, 2014. The Wing Luke is a Smithsonian Affiliate in partnership with the Smithsonian Institution

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Jeanne Armstrong's translation of 'La grand misere' is published

Jeanne Armstrong, a professor at Western Libraries, recently published her translation of La grand misère ("Great Misery") with the University of Nebraska Institutional Repository Zea Press as an open access e-book available in print on demand.

Great Misery is Maisie Renault’s story, as the editor's cover note relays, of her nine months in this “man-made hell, where brutality, starvation, sickness, filth, and degradation took a daily toll on women whose principal offense was having opposed the Nazi regime. Maisie’s story, however, is one of loyalty, devotion, faith, endurance, and the loving and self-sacrificing support that her circle of women gave each other, allowing some of them to survive the horribly cruel and inhumane conditions."

This work was originally published in French in 1948, and Professor Armstrong's translation is the first available published English version of Maisie Renault's compelling account of how she survived life inside an SS concentration camp,  "and the indomitable spirit that bound these women together and allowed them to emerge hurt, sick, battered, but unbroken and unafraid to testify about what they saw.”  For more information about this book, see the DigitalCommons@University of Nebraska here. 

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The Zeta Book Scanner is Here!

Student using new STC scanner

Western Libraries and the Student Technology Center have partnered in providing a next generation book scanner to the Learning Commons. This joint purchase was funded through Student Technology Fees to provide scanning capabilities and ease of use not previously readily available to students and faculty.

Known as the Zeta, this awesome-looking and awesome-performing scanner is perfectly designed for scanning content from bound volumes, but also accommodates flat sheets of up to 19x14 inches making it great for smaller maps.  

The Zeta’s intuitive and interactive touch screen interface allows anyone to produces great color, grey scale and black & white images in a variety of file types that can be uploaded to the campus network or taken away on a USB thumbdrive. Files can also be named and added to a shopping cart for holding until finished scanning. Then load them all at once!

The articulated book carriage allows for face up scanning of thick bound volumes without damage to the binding. It also positions both the left and right pages the same distance from the scan lens for perfect clarity. Face-up scanning makes it incredibly easy to scan your way through journal articles or a book chapter without constant flip flopping the after each page turn.

Drop by the Student Technology Center on Haggard 2 and try out the Zeta. The STC staff can answer your questions or help you get started…but that probably won’t be necessary!

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Heritage Resources offers Directed Independent Study

Western Libraries Heritage Resources offers an exciting opportunity for highly motivated and intellectually curious students to pursue an in-depth course of study that is not offered elsewhere in the curriculum. Through independent study students have an opportunity to conduct research in primary and secondary sources such as manuscripts, archives, and rare books managed by the University Archives, Library Special Collections, and/or the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies. Project proposals may involve the creation of an online exhibit, documentary film, archival finding aid, annotated bibliography, biography, specialized curriculum or specialized teaching/learning tools, a research paper, or other topics or resources as proposed. A prospectus/plan for the work should be submitted in advance of registration.  

Independent study proposals are developed in consultation with a WWU full-time faculty member and/or the Director of Heritage Resources. Interested students should begin consulting with their faculty mentors well in advance in order to develop a feasible project proposal. Priority will be given to thoughtful, structured topics that are not offered elsewhere in the undergraduate or graduate curriculum. Independent study requires that students design their own courses, create their own syllabi, and work closely with faculty mentors. Supervising professors will donate a great deal of time and effort, so students applying for independent study should be similarly committed to the project. Students must be in residence in order to undertake independent study projects. A three-credit independent study should involve at least one hour of student-faculty contact plus an additional eight hours of work per week.  It is also possible to elect two or four credit hours with appropriate changes in workload. The number of candidates accepted each quarter will vary, based on available resources and supervisory capacity.

To apply: 

  • Pick up a Directed Independent Study Permit from Connie Mallison in the Library Administration Office, 231 Haggard Hall. 
  • Working with your faculty member and member of the Heritage Resources staff, complete the permit form and attach a one-page abstract that describes goals and objectives of the Independent Study,  the desired projected learning outcomes and your qualifications to undertake the proposed project, any required resources, the expectations of the faculty supervisor, and  proposed evaluation criteria.
  • Submit your proposal to the Director of Heritage Resources and your faculty mentor for final approval.
  • Have the supervising faculty member sign the application permit.  The student will submit the permit form to the Registrar.

All proposals submitted by the Add/Drop deadline will be considered.

Prerequisite(s)/Course Notes:
Recommendation of an instructor from the student’s department; permission from the chair of student’s department and the Director of Heritage Resources.

For additional information, please contact Elizabeth Joffrion, Director of Heritage Resources, Western Libraries (360-650-3283 or Elizabeth.Joffrion@wwu.edu ).

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