Cocoon Sculpture Installation in Haggard Atrium

Wed hours: 8:30 am - 4:30 pm

Cocoon Sculpture Installation, a rendering of plastic bags as a sculpture, as something arresting to stop and view, subverts the idea that these bags are merely trash; it is a statement about sustainability through reuse of an object but more importantly it is a statement of beauty.

View now in the Haggard Atrium until June 4, 2011.

 


Artist:  Michaela Snow
(Fairhaven student)
Production Credit: Colin Pleasants  

Description

Fred Meyer shopping bags which have been manipulated so that no text shows, are
connected to make approximately 15 to 20 ft 'tubes' or 'cocoons'. Medium= varying brown plastic bags, tape, string. About 4 or 5 cocoons hung on string strung between the immobile lamp lights surrounding the circular desk on the 3rd floor of Haggard Hall above the staircase. They hang into the second floor and a viewer will be able to look at them from different angles but not touch them.
 
     
 
  
Artist Statement by Michaela Snow
  
In my corner of the world, Golden Colorado, the Fred Meyer superstore, where food an d fashion intermingle, does not exist.  During my first quarter at Fairhave n College I utilized the beige, taupe bags on the ceiling,  inspired by Marcel Duchamp's Twelve Hundred Coal  Bags.  I enjoy the process of collecting bags bri mming with bags while incredulous yet obliging Fred Meyer employees led me to the box where used bags were recycled.  I took as many as I could stuff in and attach to my backpack, filling my fingers with the rest.  My small room swimming in brown plastic, I felt I had just begun to interact with the medium.  

I admire Fred Meyer's campaign to recycle the used and forgotten bags but am aware of the petroleum-based process that melts the bags into park benches, wish is sustainably questionable but nonetheless a step in the right direction.  If Marcel Duchamp could make a urinal art, then this household trash was up to the same postmodern challenge.  These bags are undoubtedly hiding in your cupboards and the one that fell out of the trash bin headed for the landfill is patiently waiting in the corner, never to biodegrade.  Perhaps you reuse the bags as a lunch sack, a rain repellant, or a trash bag, but these onerous bags are in no way aesthetic. 

The rendering of plastic bags as a sculpture, as something arresting to stop & view, subverts the idea that these bags are merely trash.   It is a statement about sustainability through reuse of an object but more important it is a statement of beauty. The brown color of the bags when free of the Fred meyer text creates an intriguing medium that conducts light and shadows in all the small folds and wrinkles of plastic. The plastic is thin and fragile yet elastic and resilient, an excellent medium being malleable yet unpredictable. 

This site specific work is not a piece that is content to sit on a wall, it is an installation that must be interacted with as the viewer walks around it and sees it from all angles, all floors.  Part of the aim of this work is to interrupt the quotidian student life, to wonder about the things seeping down through the Haggard Atrium, which are simply garbage.