WWU Writing Success Stories

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WWU Writing Success Stories


WWU FACULTY JEANNE ARMSTRONG PUBLISHES ARTICLE ON REDESIGNING A WRITING PROFICIENCY COURSE

In 2007, WWU Faculty member with Western Libraries, Jeanne Armstrong, received a summer teaching grant to revise the AMST 499 research and writing course which she has taught every year since 2003. That September Armstrong participated in the Backwards by Design Faculty Writing Workshop offered by Carmen Werder, Director of the Writing Instruction Support Program.

As a result of the summer grant and the workshop on teaching writing proficiency, Armstrong was able to redesign the course with integrated learning outcomes. Her article on this process -- "Designing a writing intensive course with information literacy and critical thinking learning outcomes" -- was recently published and is an example of how the University's support can benefit faculty and their teaching.

 


 

WWU WRITING FELLOWS, SUZANNA PAOLA & LORI BRACK PUBLISH PIECE IN BOOK

Message from Lori Brack:

"Because of the faculty-student collaboration that the Writing Research Fellowship made possible last year, one of the exercises Suzanne Paola and I created and investigated in our research is set to come out in November in a new book, Creative Writing Demystified, edited by Sheila Bender and published by McGraw-Hill.

The piece is titled “Make Use of Disruptions to Keep Writing.”

The co-inquiry fellowship supported our study into the usefulness of disruptive writing processes with students in a classroom environment. By extension, the forthcoming short article offers the same kind of “non-traditional” writing practice to individual writers who may be blocked or need access to previously undiscovered material." (May 31, 2010)

 


 

WWU WRITING FELLOWS, CATHY MCDONALD & AMANDA HILL PUBLISH & PRESENT

These 2 are collaborative scholarship items from Catherine McDonald and Amanda Hill’s grant last year (2007-08 Writing Fellows):

"Researching the ‘Digidemic’: We’re All in It Together.”  Investigating Digital Tools, Texts, and Use Practices: Collaborative Approaches to Research in English Studies. Ed. Laura McGrath. Forthcoming.

 “Are We Ready for the ‘Digidemic’?:  Digital Waves of Change in Academic Writing.” Conference on College Composition and Communication. San Francisco. March 2009.

Catherine also used part of the research findings in a conference presentation she did alone in Oct.
“Under New Management: Digital Literacy and Public Discourse” Conference: “Who Owns Writing?” Revisited. Hoftstra University. Long Island. October, 2008.

 


 

WWU ANTHRO STUDENTS EDITORIAL LETTERS SELECTED AS EXEMPLARY IN NATIONAL COMPETITION... AGAIN

In the Spring of 2007, the students in Professor Kathleen Saunders' Introduction to Cultural Anthropology (ANTH 201) course participated in the Yanomami Community Action Project, organized by the Center for Public Anthropology. Professor Saunder's students joined with other students enrolled in introductory courses from institutions around the country, who registered on the Yanomami Community Action Website and received a 100 page booklet giving background information on an ethical dilemma in anthropology that is a current, undecided issue.

Along with the "facts of the matter" came authored opinion pieces that tried to cover the bases for point of view. Students then wrote a letter to a decision maker in the controversy stating their own considered opinion for action. These student letters were then redistributed among the all of the student participants (4 letters per enrolled student) for peer evaluation.

Through a winnowing process, five exemplary letters were selected to which all of the other students were given an opportunity to affix their (electronic) signatures before the letters were indeed sent to the addressee. Two of Professor Saunders' students, Lydia Morrison and Brandon LaFave, were among the five authors whose letters were selected. Congratulations to Lydia, Brandon and Professor Saunders on this incredible writing success!

Then, in the fall of 2008, in a new writing competition with almost 1,700 students from twelve universities in Canada and the United States, fourteen of the students in Professor Kathleen Saunders' Introduction to Cultural Anthropology class (ANTH 201) placed among the top 50 winners in Public Anthropology’s Community Action Website’s Third Fall “Action Period!”

The fourteen students are: Devin Langker, Keli Van Holde, Lesley Countner, Patrick English, Ashley Allan, Britta Nelson, Jeannie Ubigau, Kayley Gordon, Jillian Veitenheimer, Lorryn Whisnant, Casey Cobb, Kate Billlings, Samantha Weis, and Molly Riegel. Congratulations again to Professor Saunders and her fourteen student winners!